Friday, May 27, 2016

Ephesus

We entered a new continent this morning traveling from Europe to Asia overnight. We pulled in to the port of Kusadasi, Turkey at 7:00 a.m. After breakfast, we headed to Ephesus on a bus. The first stop was the house said to be where Mary, the mother of Jesus, lived the last eleven years of her life.

Her house was very small. I was curious as to how Mary ended up in Ephesus when she was from Jerusalem. No one knows for sure, but some believe she traveled there with the apostle John whom Jesus asked to look after her as he was dying on the cross.

Our next stop was the ruins of the city of Ephesus. We thought we had seen some ruins on the island of Delos, but these ruins, although not as old, were much more massive in size.

Ephesus was one of the most important cities of the Roman Empire. At its peak, around 27 B.C., a quarter of a million people lived here. This is a photo of the main avenue in the city.

The Library of Celsus was the third largest library of the ancient world with 12,000 volumes. It was built in A.D. 123 This was truly impressive in real life.

The triple arch entryway to the commercial agora. This was a huge marketplace that was the main shopping area of Ephesus.

The Great Theater dating from Hellenistic Greece, at least a century before Christ, is one of the oldest structures in Ephesus.

We ended our day with a short tour of the Basilica of St. John, lunch at a Turkish buffet, and sitting through a sales pitch on Turkish carpets.

4 comments:

  1. More great photos! Did you buy a carpet? Does anyone worry that the ancient ruins might collapse?

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  2. We did not buy a carpet. And yes, I did think of that as I was standing under those big arches.

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  3. Great pics, really enjoying them. They take me back to our trip! We didn't buy a carpet either! -Marge

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    1. Hi Marge! I thought of you today while sitting in a café in Santorini! Loving the trip. We will have to compare notes when I get back.

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